A Grammar of the Bedouin Dialects of Central and Southern by Rudolf E. de Jong

By Rudolf E. de Jong

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12 Similar forms are current in LA. 10 Bernabela 2009 transcribes ž throughout his texts for ǦbA. Also reported for ǦbA in Nishio 1992:73–74 (X-9). 12 For ǦbA Nishio 1992:38 (V-35) recorded (šanṭāt ~) šonaṭ as pl. for šanṭa. Similarly (p. 36 (V-25)) plurals are (šōkāt ~) šowak, (p. 34 (V-9) (pl. of gollɛ) golal “water jars”, (pl. of ḥōṣa) (ḥōṣāt ~) ḥowaṣ, (p. 34 (V-9)) (known in other parts of Sinai as xūṣah) “knife”, (pl. of ḥallɛ) (ḥallāt ~) ḥelal (p. 34 (V-10) “cooking pot”, nogaṭ (pl. of nogṭa) (p.

Raising of the feminine morpheme (T) The a of the fem. A. 22 Such raising is basically a pausal phenomenon. Examples are: . ilkáʿakah iy byaʿaǧinha ʿaǧīn maẓbūṭ xāliṣ “(for) this ka akah he kneads the dough extremely well”, tíšluh šwayyah nihā w šwayyah nihā bitkūn ilʾari ̣ . . e. there) and the ground will have become hot”. Examples with raising in pause ḥilwah ḥilwah bitna ̣ ̣ f ilmiʿdih . . “good, good, it (sg. ) cleans the stomach” and lamma btínḥišiy tamiṛ . . bingūl ʿalēha šannih “when it is stufffed with dates .

A. values to be reached. g. k ǟr “many (pl. )”, šgǟg “compartments of the tent”, ḥbǟl “ropes”, šǟših “screen” and also wǟḥid “one”, sǟrḥih “out grazing (goats and sheep)”, nǟgtī “my she-camel”.  Reflexes of fijinal *-ā(ʾ) Like in group VI, the reflex of fijinal *-ā in neutral environments in ṬwA and HnA is often -iʾ. Like in group VI, stress will be on the vowel of a heavy sequence that precedes, but in in group VII this inludes vowels that were originally anaptyctics and which have become part of the morphophonemic base.

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